Rounded Corners

Chillers

Typically the loudest piece of equipment in the HVAC system is the chiller. Designers place chillers in the mechanical room to prevent noise from reaching sound sensitive areas such as office spaces and conference rooms. However, even in the mechanical room, chillers can cause noise and vibration problems which can be heard by occupants.

Case Study: Novell Headquarters, Utah

Radiated Noise

Problem Solution

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Radiated Noise

This problem occurs when noise radiates through the walls, ceiling or floor. In addition, noise can break-in to the ducts of the mechanical room, travel through the ductwork, and cause a problem in a nearby occupied space.


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Floating floors, ceilings and walls create an air barrier that reduces low frequency noise and offers a great solution when chillers are neighboring sound-sensitive spaces.

HTL (High Transmission Loss) silencers and sometimes HTL ductwork is recommended in mechanical rooms where break-in is possible. Installing a silencer at the wall between the mechanical room and the occupied space will reduce break-in before and prevent breakout noise from reaching the occupied space.

Structure-borne Noise

Problem Solution

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Structure-borne Noise

Chillers are a major source of vibration. If this vibration is transferred to the structure, it can create serious noise problems in many different areas of the building. Vibration can also travel through the connecting piping.


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Inertia base with restrained isolators - The addition of mass to the bottom of the chiller helps lower the center of gravity, dampening vibration. Restrained isolators are required because of the potential change in operating weight of the chiller.

Isolation of connecting piping - Flexible connectors are required to isolate the connecting piping from the vibration source.